Music

Outside of music affecting the brain as an emotional experience, it is also a physical experience. … Listening to music can create peak emotions, which increase the amount of dopamine, a specific neurotransmitter that is produced in the brain and helps control the brain’s reward and pleasure centers.

Research has shown that development of music helps us and our children in:

Language Development. …
Increased IQ. …
The Brain Works Harder. …
Spatial-Temporal Skills. …
Improved Test Scores.

As an adult, you probably have preferences when it comes to listening to music while doing something that requires a lot of attention: studying for a test, for example, or reading a book. But what may be simple background noise to you might mean a whole lot more for your young child — particularly if they’re just beginning to pick up rudimentary language for reading and speaking.

Although some biologists argue that language is an innate skill, there have been studies done to show that listening to music can help children with their language development, all based around the idea that music closely mirrors the pitch, timbre, and tempo of everyday speech.